Downing Frye Realty Inc.
Molly Eovino, Downing Frye Realty Inc.Phone: (239) 537-5100
Email: [email protected]

Fresh to the Neighborhood: Dealing with Your Neighbors

by Molly Eovino 02/02/2020

Photo by Ricarda Mölck via Pixabay

Moving to a new neighborhood brings with it, well, the new neighbors. Although you may be an exceptionally private person — others, by nature, are naturally curious. They want to know who’s moved in next door. This is particularly true when your house is just a few feet or a few inches away from their house. Sometimes, your window looks right out on their window — and vice versa. When it comes to nosy neighbors, follow these tips.

Be Proactive

Introduce yourself and satisfy their curiosity about your basic information. Without getting too personal, let them know who is living in the house with you and if you moved into the neighborhood for a specific reason.

Be Prepared

Many neighborhoods have a neighborhood watch. If this is the case, meet the people that look out for strangers so that they know who you are. Ask them questions too so that you know what kinds of things trigger a response from the watch or from other neighbors. If your neighborhood has an association, ask about it and meet the officers.

Be Courteous

People that live in one place for an exceptionally long time may fear change. Let them know you hope to love the neighborhood as much as they do. If their questions bother you, deflect and redirect the conversation.

Be Inventive

Builders don’t always pay attention to how one house aligns with another. If your neighbor’s dining room overlooks your bathroom, cover your bathroom windows with a frosted or stained-glass overlay. It’s a simple fix that lets daylight shine in your bathroom without the neighbors peering in, even accidentally. If it’s a bedroom window, cellular blinds let light in but give full coverage.

Be Friendly

When the opportunity arises, invite your neighbor for a cup of tea or simply to share a conversation while you weed the flowerbed. Friendliness goes a long way toward increasing everyone’s comfort level as new neighbors. Moving into a new neighborhood is a time of adjustment for both the old neighbors and the new. 

If you’re proactive, prepared, courteous, inventive and friendly, you’ll soon move from being merely neighbors to being friends. Your real estate professional is a great resource on learning about your neighborhood too, so ask them what they know.

About the Author
Author

Molly Eovino

My educational background spans a multitude of areas, but now they all concentrate on improving my real estate performance. It includes:
BA degrees in Psychology & Vocational Rehabilitation from the University of Northern Colorado.
Mediation Seminars for the Iowa Farmer-Creditor Mediation Services.
Real Estate License in Iowa, REALTOR® 1988
Graduate of the Realtor´s Institute (GRI) 1992
Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) 1994
Accredited Buyer Representative (ABR) 1999-2018
Licensed Broker-Associate, Florida, 2001
Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE) 2009
Certified Investor Agent Specialist (CIAS) 2012
Resort & Second Home Property Specialist (RSPS) 2016